Learning with Landmarks

University of Texas Landmarks - Represents screen shot 2019 05 03 at 10.40.25 am 0?itok=pQr IwGX

During the weekend of 26 April 2019, Landmarks artist Casey Reas visited campus for a Q&A with Austin-based filmmaker and creator of digital rotoscoping software Bob Sabiston. Following the Q&A, Reas led more than 30 students in a two-day rotoscope workshop, culminating in a public reception and screening of nine student animations in the Fine Arts Library Foundry.

shell sculpture in front of building

Chandler Householder is a second year architecture student and a Landmarks Docent. To satisfy the writing requirement for her world architecture course, she wrote Scalar Implications: Changing Effects in Aesthetic Pleasure of Art and Architecture, a study of the beautiful, the picturesque, and the sublime in art and architecture.

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Communications and marketing intern, Holland Chaney, sits down with Landmarks Preservation Guild member, Kristin Garrison.

Students in front of mural

Looking at and talking about art has become popular in non-art related disciplines like medical sciences, engineering, and mathematics. These types of tours are a favorite at Landmarks because they result in new perspectives and insights about the collection.

Student conserving sculpture

As students return to campus eager to start a new year, many will join clubs and groups to meet new people and build specialized skills. Landmarks has two distinct volunteer programs that help keep our program running. Landmarks Docents are trained to lead visitors on tours of the collection. They learn about important trends in modern and contemporary art, how to engage with their audience, and public speaking skills. Landmarks Preservation Guild (LPG) helps maintain the works of art in the collection.

Artist Ann Hamilton signing a book

As part of the opening celebrations for Ann Hamilton's O N E E V E R Y O N E, Landmarks hosted a writing workshop lead by Dr. Kathleen Stewart, Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UT.