Ann Hamilton

O N E E V E R Y O N E is a public art project commissioned by Landmarks for the Dell Medical School. Its primary expression is a series of community portraits in which touch—something we feel more than we see—becomes visible. In the images we sense the glance of cloth’s fall, the weight of a hand, the press of a face, the possibility of recognition. More than 500 volunteers at 12 community sites were photographed through semi-transparent membrane that registered in focus only what immediately touched its surface, while rendering more softly the gesture or outline of the body.

More Information

Press Release - 6 December 2016

The University of Texas at Austin to Feature New Work by Ann Hamilton in January 2017: Unveiling of ONEEVERYONE Commission and Exhibition

Landmarks, UT’s public art program, expands its collection by adding the largest iteration of Hamilton’s ONEEVERYONE portrait series

hamilton-landmarks.org

 

AUSTIN, Texas — Landmarks, The University of Texas at Austin’s public art program, will unveil ONEEVERYONE, a community-based photography project by Ann Hamilton on 26-28 January  2017. A site-responsive commission for the university’s Dell Medical School, the project includes: 71 porcelain enamel portrait panels; a 900-page book designed by Hamilton that will circulate freely; a newspaper with texts by scientists, philosophers, poets, and essayists; and a website for the public to download her images. Hamilton photographed more than 500 volunteers in various Austin locations, making this the largest ONEEVERYONE portrait series developed to date. To complement the unveiling, an exhibition at the university’s Visual Arts Center (VAC) will feature a selection of smaller portraits and offer an examination of the artist’s process (27 January to 24 February 2017).

The commission of Hamilton’s work was initiated by Landmarks, one of the most important public art programs to emerge at an American university. On view throughout Austin’s 433-acre main campus, the Landmarks collection includes works by Michael Ray Charles, Mark di Suvero, David Ellis, Sol LeWitt, Marc Quinn, Ben Rubin, Nancy Rubins, and James Turrell. Landmarks’ public art collection is broadly accessible and free to all, providing opportunities for students and visitors to engage with great works of art.

 “Hamilton’s commission extends many of her longstanding concerns, expressed in Austin as a series of photographs among other forms,” said Andrée Bober, the founding director of Landmarks. “Her portraits represent individuals and encompass the full arc of human existence—where life appears, where the soma and psyche are cared for, and where it ends.”

Clay Johnston, dean of the Dell Medical School adds, “Public art that starts conversations and inspires creativity and community connections is vital to the culture we strive to promote. In particular, the collaboration at the core of this project reflects the medical school's close connection with our community, as well as the important role that all people play in improving health."

Ann Hamilton was engaged by Landmarks in a series of residencies to create portraits of community members. At twelve locations throughout Austin, she photographed volunteers through a semi-transparent membrane that registers in focus only what immediately touches its surface. The more than 500 participants included caregivers, faculty, students, staff, community partners, civic leaders, and patients—everyone who has provided or received care.

Among many expressions of Hamilton’s project, 25 portraits have been selected to become full-scale enamel panels to be permanently installed at public thresholds in the Dell Medical School’s Health Discovery and Health Learning Buildings. Forty-six smaller panels featured in the VAC exhibition will be relocated to additional spaces within the medical school complex following the exhibition. Hamilton’s photographic library of approximately 7,000 images may be used in future buildings of the Dell Medical School as well as in other graphic applications, including a book that contains images of each participant. Ten thousand copies will be given to the public, and portraits will be available to download online, both for free.

The VAC exhibition, curated by Landmarks, opens 27 January and is on view through 24 February. It contains enamel portrait panels, books, newspapers, and process information. Moreover, authors from a range of disciplines were selected by Hamilton to contribute interpretive texts that will be published online and in a newspaper available in the exhibition. Writers include Laurel Braitman, Matthew Goulish, Kris Paulsen, Nancy Princenthal, Brian Rotman, Natalie Shapero, Meg Shevenock, and Katie Stewart.

Partner institutions include: Central Health/Southeast Health and Wellness Center, The Contemporary Austin, Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas, Seton Healthcare Family, Dell Medical School, Department of Art & Art History, Humanities Institute, Huston-Tillotson University, North Central Health Center, The Senate Chamber at the Texas State Capitol, Visual Arts Center, and Westminster Retirement Community.

The project supports Landmarks’ broader strategy to develop an extraordinary public art collection that both enhances the aesthetic character of the campus and supports pedagogy. An ongoing percent-for-art allocation ensures the collection develops in tandem with the rapid expansion of the campus. With the addition of Hamilton’s portraits, Landmarks adds its first photography to the collection as it continues to advance its mission to present iconic works of art.

ABOUT LANDMARKS

Established in 2008, Landmarks is the award-winning public art program of The University of Texas at Austin. Founding director Andrée Bober leads the development of the collection and oversees a vibrant range of programs that support scholarship and learning. Landmarks places outdoor public art according to the university’s Public Art Master Plan, developed in collaboration with Peter Walker Partners Landscape Architects. Its collection of modern and contemporary works includes 28 sculptures on long-term loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, enabling Landmarks to foster learning through its conservation efforts. Landmarks provides technical training for student volunteers who preserve the sculptures, the only known program of its kind in the United States.

By bringing great art to The University of Texas at Austin, Landmarks enriches the lives of students and visitors, engaging thousands of people every day.

Download the press release.

 

Fact Sheet - 6 December 2016

LANDMARKS PRESENTS ARTIST ANN HAMILTON

Panels of various people standing in a foggy haze.

hamilton-landmarks.org

 

ANN HAMILTON

Ann Hamilton is a visual artist internationally recognized for the sensory surrounds of her large-scale multimedia installations and public projects. Using time as process and material, her methods serve as an invocation of place, of collective voice, of communities past and of labor present. Noted for a dense accumulation of materials, her ephemeral environments create immersive experiences that poetically respond to the architectural presence and social history of their sites. Whether inhabiting a building four stories high or confined to the surface of a thimble, the genesis of Hamilton’s art extends outwards from the primary projections of the hand and mouth.

Trained in textile design at the University of Kansas and sculpture at Yale School of Art, Hamilton’s pieces represent an interdisciplinary artistic dialogue that often “weaves” together different elements to create a cohesive project or image. With a career that spans more than thirty years, Hamilton has received many awards including the MacArthur Fellowship, United States Artists Fellowship, NEA Visual Arts Fellowship, the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, and the National Medal of the Arts.

 

O N E E V E R Y O N E

O N E E V E R Y O N E is a public art project by Ann Hamilton, commissioned by Landmarks for the Dell Medical School. It is framed by the idea that human touch and intimacy are the most essential means of contact and the fundamental expression of physical care. The project began as a campaign to photograph members of the Austin community and expanded to assume multiple forms: 71 porcelain enamel portrait panels located at the Dell Medical School; a 900-page book designed by Hamilton that will circulate freely; a newspaper with contributions by scientists, philosophers, poets, and essayists; and a website for the public to download her images.

Hamilton photographed more than 500 participants at twelve Austin locations for the project, making this the largest O N E V E R Y O N E portrait series to date. Volunteers were photographed through a semi-transparent membrane that sharply focused parts of the body that made contact with the material and softly blurred the parts that moved away from it. The optical quality of the material renders touch—something felt, more than seen—visible.

O N E V E R Y O N E serves as an overarching project with a multitude of forms, both physically – within the Dell Medical School and in the print edition of the book – and digitally, through the public website. Among many expressions of Hamilton’s project, 25 portraits have been selected to become full-scale enamel panels to be permanently installed at public thresholds in the Dell Medical School’s Health Discovery and Health Learning Buildings, and 46 smaller panels will be featured in additional spaces within the medical school complex. Hamilton’s photographic library of approximately 7,000 images may be used in future buildings of the Dell Medical School as well as in other graphic applications, including a book that contains images of each participant. Ten thousand copies of this book will be given to the public and portraits will be available to download online at hamilton-landmarks.org, both for free.

 

UNVEILING AND CEBERATION EVENTS

Landmarks unveils O N E V E R Y O N E through a series of public events taking place between 26-28 January 2017. Meant to provide an opportunity for the community to experience and discuss the commission, these events will include a public talk hosted by Landmarks in partnership with the Humanities Institute, a Q&A and exhibition opening with Ann Hamiliton hosted by Landmarks in collaboration with the Visual Arts Center, and a community book signing hosted at the Dell Medical School.

A little girl standing behind a hazy fog.

Thursday, 26 January 2017

O N E V E R Y O N E : A Conversation with Ann Hamilton
In collaboration with the Humanities Institute
LBJ Auditorium | 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Join Landmarks and the Humanities Institute for a public talk to celebrate the unveiling of Ann Hamilton’s work in Austin, featuring readings by Matthew Goulish, Brian Rotman, Natalie Shapero, and a discussion with Ann Hamilton led by Pauline Strong. Their conversation complements the Humanities Institute’s 2017 theme of Health, Well-Being, and Healing.  With a mission to build civic and intellectual community within, across, and beyond the university's walls by bringing people together to explore issues and ideas that matter, the Humanities Institute hosts educational programs, cultural events and public forums that serve as a gateway to the varied resources of The University of Texas at Austin.

 

Friday, 27 January 2017

Landmarks Q&A with Ann Hamilton
In collaboration with the Visual Arts Center
ART Building Auditorium | 5:30 pm

Exhibition Opening of O N E E V E R Y O N E
Visual Arts Center Gallery | 6:00 pm            

Join Landmarks and the Visual Arts Center for a conversation and Q&A between Ann Hamilton and art critic Nancy Princenthal to celebrate the exhibition opening of O N E V E R Y O N E in Austin. The conversation will investigate the artist’s process and various forms of the project. Following the discussion, guests may view of a selection of panels featuring Hamilton’s photography and receive her book and newspaper at the Visual Arts Center gallery, on view until 27 February. Admission is free and open to the public. To RSVP for the Q&A, please visit landmarksrvsp.org or visit hamilton-landmarks.org for more information about the project.

 

Saturday, 28 January 2017

O N E E V E R Y O N E Book Signing
Dell Medical School, Health Learning Building | 2:00 – 5:00 pm

Drop by the Dell Medical School’s Health Learning Building to collect a free copy of the 900-page book designed by Ann Hamilton for O N E V E R Y O N E and have it signed by the artist. The book features many of the 7,000 photographs taken over the course of three residencies in Austin. It accompanies the permanent large-scale enamel panels featured in the Dell Medical School, the temporary exhibition at the Visual Arts Center, and the online resource website where individuals may view and download the images. In addition to the artist, members of the Landmarks staff will be in attendance to discuss the project.

 

ABOUT LANDMARKS

Landmarks is the award-winning public art program of The University of Texas at Austin. Its collection of forty modern and contemporary works of art includes commissions from some of the most admired and promising artist of our time. By bringing great art to the main campus, Landmarks enriches the lives of students and visitors, engaging thousands of people every day. For more information about Landmarks and its free tours and events, please visit the Landmarks website.  

High-Resolution Photography Available Upon Request

 

LINKS AND RESOURCES

http://www.hamilton-landmarks.org

http://landmarks.utexas.edu

http://landmarksrsvp.org

http://www.annhamiltonstudio.com/

 

CONTACT

Sarah Van Zee | lookthinkmake
sarah@lookthinkmake.com
512.402.6861 (o) | 803.441.7198 (m)

Kelsey Kemper | lookthinkmake
kelsey@lookthinkmake.com
512.402.6861 (o) | 214.733.3636 (m)  

Nick Nobel | Landmarks
nobel@utexas.edu
512.232.5904

Download the fact sheet.

Press Release - 7 July 2016

Landmarks, the public art program of The University of Texas at Austin, acquires major works by Marc Quinn and Ann Hamilton

Landmarks' collection expands with the acquisition of a monumental sculpture by Marc Quinn and a newly commissioned project by Ann Hamilton 

Austin, Texas – 7 July 2016 – Landmarks today announced two significant additions: the recent acquisition of Marc Quinn’s 2013 sculpture, Spiral of the Galaxy, to be unveiled on 24 October 2016; and the commission of O N E E V E R Y O N E, a community-based photography project by Ann Hamilton (January 2017). Both works will be installed at the university’s Dell Medical School and are funded through a percent-for-art allocation that sets aside one-to-two percent of capital improvement projects for the acquisition of public art.

“Adding Marc Quinn and Ann Hamilton to the diverse roster of artists represented by Landmarks is an honor,” said Andrée Bober, the founding director of the program. “Quinn’s biomorphic sculpture and Hamilton’s intimate portraits complement each other in unexpected ways. Both wrestle with bigger ideas about the human form and healing, making them ideally suited for the new Dell Medical School.”

Marc Quinn’s artistic practice is preoccupied with the mutability of the body and the dualisms that define human life: spiritual and physical, surface and depth, cerebral and sexual. Spiral of the Galaxy, Quinn’s seven-ton bronze sculpture, was first shown at an exhibition of the artist’s work in 2013 at the Giorgio Cini Foundation in Venice, Italy. Landmarks’ acquisition was cast as the artist’s proof alongside an edition of three, and it will be the only example of the piece in the United States. Placed at the gateway to the Dell Medical School, the monumental sculpture depicts an elegant conch shell. The conch carries cultural and religious significance, and among many interpretations can be construed here as a complex structure that protects delicate organisms.

Ann Hamilton engaged in a three-part residency for Landmarks to create portraits of local community members. Her images evoke the human form, touch, and the care and attention of healers. During each residency, she photographed volunteers through a semi-transparent membrane that renders in focus only what touches the surface and softly blurs the gestures and outlines of the sitters. The optical quality of the material renders touch—something felt more than seen—visible. The life of every citizen will intersect with the health care system and these portraits include caregivers, faculty, students, staff, community partners, civic leaders and patients themselves.

Hamilton will select around two dozen portraits to install in the new Center for Health Learning and Center for Health Discovery buildings in early 2017. Her library of approximately 500 subjects may be used in future buildings of the Dell Medical School as well as in other graphic applications, including a book that contains images of each participant. 10,000 copies will be given to the public, and portraits will be available to download online for free. With more than 500 portraits taken in various locations across the city, Hamilton’s residency in Austin is the largest O N E E V E R Y O N E series developed to date.

“The University of Texas at Austin is building the first new medical school at a top-tier research university in nearly 50 years, offering the unique opportunity to rethink the role of academic medicine in better serving society’s needs,” said Clay Johnston, inaugural dean of the Dell Medical School. “With unprecedented support from our community, we are creating a medical school for the 21st century that draws upon innovative thinking from across disciplines, from engineering to the arts. Public art that starts conversations and inspires creativity and community connections is vital to the environment we envision.”

The installation of these two works supports Landmarks’ broader strategy to develop an extraordinary public art collection that both enhances the aesthetic character of the campus and supports pedagogy. An ongoing percent-for-art allocation ensures the collection will develop in tandem with the rapid expansion of the campus. With these upcoming additions, Landmarks continues to advance its mission to present iconic works of art that convey the university’s ideals.

In addition to site-specific commissions and acquisitions, Landmarks features 28 mid- to late-20th-century sculptures on long-term loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, including works by Magdalena Abakanowicz, Louise Bourgeois, Deborah Butterfield, Anthony Caro, Jim Dine, Donald Lipski, Beverly Pepper, Antoine Pevsner, Tony Smith, and Ursula von Rydingsvard. Beyond its aesthetic value, the group demonstrates significant art historical trends from the second half of the 20th century. The collection also fosters learning through its conservation efforts. Landmarks provides technical training for student volunteers who preserve the sculptures, the only known program of its kind in the United States.

Marc Quinn was born in London in 1964. He graduated from Cambridge University with a degree in history and history of art, and subsequently worked as an assistant to the sculptor Barry Flanagan. He is one of the leading artists of his generation, creating sculptures, paintings, and drawings that explore the dynamic between art and science, and the human body relative to perceptions of beauty. Other key subjects include cycles of growth and evolution through topics such as genetics and the manipulation of DNA, as well as issues of life, death, and identity. Quinn’s work uses a broad range of materials, both traditional and unorthodox. The materiality of the object, in both its elemental composition and surface appearance, is at the heart of Quinn’s work.

Ann Hamilton was born in Lima, Ohio, in 1956. She received a BFA in textile design from the University of Kansas in 1979 and an MFA in sculpture from the Yale School of Art in 1985. Ann Hamilton is a visual artist internationally recognized for the sensory surrounds of her large-scale multimedia installations. Using time as process and material, her methods serve as an invocation of place, of collective voice, of communities past and of labor present. Her ephemeral environments create immersive experiences that poetically respond to the architectural presence and social history of their sites.

Download the press release.

Project History

Commissioned by Landmarks for the Dell Medical School, O N E E V E R Y O N E includes photographs of more than five hundred members of the Austin community. Rooted  in the idea that human touch and intimacy are the most essential means of contact and the fundamental expression of physical care, the project welcomed the participation of all who had either provided or received care.

Nancy Princenthal, art critic and faculty member of the School of Visual Arts, contributed the artist essay, which provides greater detail about Hamilton and her work.

Funding for O N E E V E R Y O N E was provided by the capital improvement project for Dell Medical School. This project would not have been possible without generous assistance from many including: Dean Clay Johnston, John Daigre, Ricardo Puemape, Lisa Jones, and the Dell Medical School; Pat Clubb and University Operations; Dean Douglas Dempster and the College of Fine Arts; Bob Rawski and the Office of Facilities Planning and Construction and project managers Jim Shackelford, Bill Simpson, and Chris Upton; David Rea and the Office of Campus Planning and Facilities Management; the Campus Master Planning Committee; the Landmarks Advisory Committee; Page Sutherland Page; Ann Hamilton, Nicole Gibbs, Jessica Naples, Nicole Rome and the Ann Hamilton studio; and Vault Fine Art Services.

Press Highlights

Meet the Austin poster girl in that dreamy new Dell Medical School art
Michael Barnes, Austin American-Statesman, 22 February 2017
It so happens that on this sunny day, Zoë is the poster child, literally, for the first portion of a three-building art installation at the medical school. During Zoë’s interview with this reporter, Ann Hamilton, a distinguished Ohio-based multimedia artist, was seated behind a long table downstairs, signing fat, free books that go with the art project — “Oneeveryone, 2017” — which presents cloudy images of scores of Austinites, Zoë among them.

A Human Touch: Ann Hamilton’s Portraits at UT Austin
Carol Strickland, Art in America, 10 February 2017
Studies have documented a link between art on hospital walls and patient wellbeing. Images of natural landscapes-in blue and green hues-have the most calming effect. Other physiological effects of art include reduced reaction to stress, higher pain threshold, less anxiety, and positive outcomes like shorter hospital stays. Whether Hamilton's portraits will have these benefits is still unknown. What is clear in the misty, ethereal images is that, in an age of high-tech medicine, they foreground the healing human touch.

Ann Hamilton’s Portraits that Blur and Isolate
Anne Blood, Hyperallergic, 09 February 2017
Ann Hamilton’s portrait series O N E E V E R Y O N E is based on two ideas: the systematic representation of the individual and the commonality of people in all their manifestations. The bridge between these two ideas is touch, which plays a literal and abstract role in the work.

No Smiling: Ann Hamilton’s Latest, a Portrait Series In a Texas Medical Center
Scott Indrisek, Observer, 30 January 2017
“It’s not about the photography,” Ann Hamilton said, curiously, of her latest, photo-based project. “It’s the exchange.” Indeed, exchange—along with vulnerability, empathy, and trust—would loom large in a word cloud of how the artist, during a week’s worth of public talks, described her latest endeavor, at the Dell Seton Medical Center in Austin, Texas.

UT's Public Arts Program Debuts an Ambitious New Project
Robert Faires, The Austin Chronicle, 27 January 2017
Touch, you see, is central to this latest iteration of O N E E V E R Y O N E, one that Hamilton has developed for Austin and, specifically, the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas. Just as touch is integral to any health care experience – from the nurse's hand against your forehead feeling for a fever to the surgeon's handling of a transplanted heart – touch is key to the experience of these portraits: It's where the images find clarity.

ONEEVERYONE: A Q&A with Ann Hamilton
Kathleen Brady Stimpert, Glasstire, 23 January 2017
In a time when we’re increasingly removed from one another, ONEEVERYONE, Ann Hamilton’s ambitious new work for UT Austin, is especially important. With its emphasis on connection and the power of touch, it offers the perfect antidote to the endless static of texts, emails, and emoticons. It reminds us to actually look at one another, and to really see.

Ann Hamilton's Enlightened Touch
Dan Duray, Surface, 23 January 2017
Well along in the development of Ann Hamilton’s latest undertaking, “O N E E V E R Y O N E,” the artist made something of a scientific discovery. This was appropriate, given that the site-specific project, which debuted late in January, is installed around the University of Texas Austin’s recently opened Dell Medical School.

In the Studio: Ann Hamilton
Jean Dykstra, Photograph, Jan/Feb 2017
In describing the process behind these partially opaque portraits, Hamilton notes that the subjects could not see her, but had to follow her voice alone, telling them to turn a bit, or press against the curtain. That exchange, she suggests, led to “an interiority that is more private, more vulnerable than the self we offer up in the world of a constantly present camera.”

Contact

Landmarks

The University of Texas at Austin
College of Fine Arts
2305 Trinity St., PAC 3.204
Austin, TX 78712
landmarks@austin.utexas.edu
512.495.4315

Press Office

Nick Nobel, External Affairs Coordinator
The University of Texas at Austin
College of Fine Arts
2305 Trinity St., PAC 3.204
Austin, TX 78712
nobel@utexas.edu
512.232.5904