Learning with Landmarks

Learning with Landmarks is a dedicated blog series highlighting the unique and innovative ways that students and other scholars use the collection. Landmarks’ blog, Latest, features timely updates on new installations, public programs, event announcements, volunteer and internship opportunities, and a range of other initiatives. To view the entire series, click the button below.

people standing under monumental mural

School of Architecture students create unique design interventions for Amistad América by José Parlá, a mural located in high-traffic Rowling Hall.

artful arrangement of wooden crutches

Landmarks interviewed Elizabeth Upenieks, who volunteered as a Landmarks docent for nearly three years. We discussed her favorite parts of the Landmarks collection and her experience as a docent, as well as how those experiences have informed her professional career.

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During the weekend of 26 April 2019, Landmarks artist Casey Reas visited campus for a Q&A with Austin-based filmmaker and creator of digital rotoscoping software Bob Sabiston. Following the Q&A, Reas led more than 30 students in a two-day rotoscope workshop, culminating in a public reception and screening of nine student animations in the Fine Arts Library Foundry.

shell sculpture in front of building

Chandler Householder is a second year architecture student and a Landmarks Docent. To satisfy the writing requirement for her world architecture course, she wrote Scalar Implications: Changing Effects in Aesthetic Pleasure of Art and Architecture, a study of the beautiful, the picturesque, and the sublime in art and architecture.

University of Texas Landmarks - Represents kristin 1 0?itok=mprII4ap

Communications and marketing intern, Holland Chaney, sits down with Landmarks Preservation Guild member, Kristin Garrison.

Students in front of mural

Looking at and talking about art has become popular in non-art related disciplines like medical sciences, engineering, and mathematics. These types of tours are a favorite at Landmarks because they result in new perspectives and insights about the collection.